Thursday, April 24, 2014

Vital Tests For Your Healthy Senior

Even if your senior is enjoying good health, it’s important to make sure that they stay on top of their physical well-being. They need to get regular screenings in order to identify any potential problems before they’re allowed to progress. Senior health experts encourage elderly individuals over the age of 60 to get the following exams regularly:

Colon cancer screening tests

A colonoscopy is a necessary test to identify the presence of colon cancer and other problems in this area. It should be done every 10 years, beginning at the age of 50; however, some may need it more frequently if they have an elevated risk of the disease. 

Blood pressure

Millions of Americans are dealing with high blood pressure and have no idea. This sets them up for a series of health concerns, including heart, brain, and kidney problems. Your elderly loved one should have their blood pressure checked by a doctor at least once a year.

A breast exam and mammogram for women

Because breast cancer risks increase with age, it’s important for older women to get regular mammograms and have a breast exam done by a doctor. Some doctors advise getting a mammogram every one to two years starting at age 40 or 50, though opinions on this matter vary, so it’s important that your senior talks with her healthcare professional. 

Monitoring weight

Senior care experts explain that as a person ages, they often gain weight. This is due to a slowed metabolism and other biological factors. While some amount of weight gain is normal, make sure that this is kept in check. If your elderly loved one gets particularly overweight, it can up their risk for a number of serious health concerns.

A rectal exam

While this is one of the exams seniors dread the most, it’s also one of the most necessary. The rectal exam and a fecal occult blood test (FOBT) can raise awareness about masses or bleeding that a person may not be able to detect with the naked eye. It can alert a medical professional to serious but treatable problems in the colon, and can also send up a signal about prostate cancer in men. Though these tests and others may cause a few moments of discomfort, they play a crucial part in prolonging your elderly parent’s health and well-being. 



Tuesday, April 22, 2014

Tips for Preventing Accidents in Your Senior’s Home

Even a small obstruction on the ground can pose a major accident risk for senior. Just a few seconds off balance can result in devastating injury. Because of this, it’s important to take time to accident-proof your elderly loved one’s home, making it a safe place for them to relax. There are a number of easy and quick ways to do this, including:

  • Keep floors clean at all times: Grandkids’ toys, pet food bowls, shoes, clothing items, and upturned corners of rugs can all pose a major risk as your elderly parent moves about their home. To greatly reduce the chances of a fall, keep floors clean at all times. Find neat ways to organize toys, cords, and other items, and get rid of all unnecessary area rugs.
  • Keep floors dry: Not only should floors be clear of clutter, those who work in elder care services explain that they should also be kept clean and dry. Greasy food spills make it easy for a senior to lose their balance and fall. Make sure any wax used on floors is non-slip, and help your loved one mop up spills as soon as they happen.
  • Install proper lighting: If rooms are poorly lit, your elderly parent may get off balance and end up slipping on their way to the kitchen or bathroom. Make sure that all light bulbs are replaced quickly, and that the wattage is bright enough to make a difference.
  • Install a grab bar in the shower: It is common for elderly individuals to find showering challenging, explain home care professionals, as they have to be on their feet maneuvering around for an extended period of time. To make showering safe, install a grab bar in the tub. This allows your loved one to quickly regain their balance if they get unstable for a moment. It can also make entering and exiting the tub much easier.
  • Place benches throughout the home: Much like a grab bar in the shower, placing benches in your senior’s home makes it easy to take a rest and catch their breath should they feel slightly off balance for a moment. Put benches throughout the house to allow them to sit down safely when they need to rest.

Do not neglect the outside of your elderly parent’s home either. Make sure that walkways are cleared and salted during snowy months, and that paths are illuminated by bright outdoor lighting. 

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Help Your Senior Enjoy Gardening Safely This Spring

Gardening is a terrific way for your senior to relax and get some exercise. If your elderly parent has a green thumb, they’re one of more than 78 million people who enjoy the pastime, according to the National Gardening Association. According to those who work in senior care, activities such as gardening are soothing, yet they also help an elderly individual to feel productive and inspired. But before you get out and get planting with your loved one, make sure to use these tips to protect their physical well-being as they go:

  • Invest in the right tools: If the gardening tools are too short, your senior will have to hunch over and may suffer a back injury as a result. Make sure all items used in the garden are the proper length. Long-handled or curved-handled tools are also easier for senior hands to use. 
  • Drink plenty of water: Since gardening is a pastime enjoyed during the warmer months, it’s important to be aware of dehydration risks. Encourage your elderly parent to drink plenty of water as they get to work. Also advise them to avoid being out between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m., as these are the hottest parts of the day. 
  • Wear lightweight clothing: Shade the body from direct sunlight by wearing a light long-sleeved shirt, linen pants, a big hat, eye protection, and gardening gloves. Remind your elderly loved one to regularly apply sunscreen, particularly if they are sweating. 
  • Bring out a stool or chair: Gardening requires a lot of hunching over and stooping, which can take a toll on an older person’s back after a few hours. To prevent injury, bring out a stool, chair, or bench. This allows your loved one to get to work, without suffering the consequences the next day.
  • Paint tools a bright color: To make it easy to quickly spot gardening tools, paint handles a bright color. This prevents frustration about lost tools and allows your senior to avoid tripping on them, as the brown handles blend in with the dirt. 

Elder care professionals encourage seniors and their families to spend time developing a garden. Regardless of how big or small, the experience is a positive and exciting way to spend time together while enjoying fresh air and sunshine. 

Monday, April 14, 2014

Caregiver Communication Tips for Seniors with Dementia

Communicating with and caring for a loved one with dementia can prove difficult; the disease erodes a person’s rational thinking abilities. They may have severe mood swings and trouble interacting with others, not to mention debilitating memory problems. As a result, the lengthy conversations you once enjoyed will need to change and evolve. In order to communicate successfully with an elderly parent who has dementia, consider the following tips:

State your message clearly

Elder care professionals explain that those with Alzheimer’s can quickly become confused by wordy or convoluted messages. As a result, they may become overwhelmed and start to get upset. To prevent this from happening, make sure to get to the point quickly. Use simple words and sentences, and speak slowly and distinctly. Always use a reassuring tone, and never raise your voice. 

If a question is posed and the senior doesn’t understand, use the same wording to repeat the question. Avoid speaking in a louder or higher voice. If there is still confusion, wait a brief moment and repeat the question, rephrasing it as you go. Instead of using pronouns like “he” or “she,” make sure to use names of people to prevent confusion. Say, “That’s what Sue told me” instead of “That’s what she told me,” even if “she” feels more natural in the sentence.

Make it a positive interaction

Tone of voice and body language can quickly convey emotion whether you realize it or not. Make sure that you are turning your interactions into positive ones by speaking in a pleasant manner and conveying this kind of body language too. Use a soft tone of voice and a happy facial expression to further signify that you are showing affection toward the individual. Take care not to use too much physical touch too suddenly, as this can startle the senior or cause them to get agitated. 

Break tasks down into smaller chunks

Presenting your elderly loved one with three or four different steps can quickly overwhelm them, causing them to get upset. Instead, break these tasks into more manageable chunks. Start with step one, and then move onto step two. You may need to remind them what they’re supposed to be doing along the way.

While it can be sad and frustrating to see an elderly loved one struggle with dementia, knowing how to communicate with this person can keep your relationship strong, even as their mind changes. Instead of focusing on the challenges, turn your attention toward the positive, happy moments that occur during the day. 

Thursday, April 10, 2014

Online Alzheimer’s Resources You Should Know About

Caring for an elderly loved one with Alzheimer’s is no easy feat, particularly when a person is trying to juggle work responsibilities, young children, and other aspects of their life. For this reason, dementia care professionals encourage families dealing with Alzheimer’s to utilize the multitude of online resources available today for support and education. Some of these tools include:


According to those who work in elder care, Chapel Hill families can use this online resource to help them find a variety of different kinds of assistance for their seniors. Narrow the search down by location, as well as by the kind of care that is needed. Additionally, the site helps put families in touch with other necessary professionals, like those who specialize in elder abuse prevention and home repair and modifications.


For adult children who are trying to shoulder the burden of caregiving, this site can be a welcome place to visit online. It offers a range of resources and tools that a person who cares for an elderly parent with Alzheimer’s can use, including links to support groups, tips for caregivers, and agencies and organizations that may be of use. 


This group provides resources, important research information, and other materials that caregivers can draw upon. It even hosts a conference each year. This year’s conference is called “Aging in America: 2014 Annual Conference of the American Society on Aging.” Through information and understanding, the group helps to lighten an adult child’s burden.


The Ethnic Elders Care Network is specifically targeted at caregivers to ethnic elderly individuals. The organization focuses on promoting research findings, prevention, and treatment methods of Alzheimer’s disease and other memory disorders. They also want to offer educational materials, support and assistance to ethnic minority elderly patients, as well as their families and caregivers.

Tackling caregiving duties can become overwhelming, making support an essential part of daily life. Whether this is in the form of an in-person support group or valuable educational tools available online, these materials can make a major difference in the life of a caregiver.